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View Full Version : Any Godin Multiac Nylon fans out there?


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ewalling
05-28-2010, 10:48 PM
I was in GC yesterday afternoon and tried one of the above guitars that they had in. I used to own an ACS-SA but this felt like a different beast altogether. This Multiac actually sounded pretty good unplugged; in fact, I didn't even plug it in! It also felt substantial, too - it has quite a big thick body, which is more suited to us acoustic players.

Anyone have one of these? I'm giving them some serious thought right now.

jayhawk
05-29-2010, 07:45 AM
Before I bought my Applegate I looked at one. There were things I really liked about it. It played well and with a midi it would have been versatile and a lot of fun. In the end I decided I just wanted a really nice nylon guitar. If I were to get a 2nd nylon string, I would very strongly consider the Godin.

Jack

BLenmark
05-29-2010, 12:52 PM
...and run it though a Roland synthesizer to a Fender Acoustasonic. The guitar itself plays like an electric...very easy to fret and play scales and leads. The piezo sounds great through a Dtar Mama Bear, a little quacky straight to the amp. The midi and synth is where the instrument really opens new sonic doors. You can split out the analog and Midi signals so that you are providing your own back up. Think something like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPL3O7NmgpI

I have not gigged with it, but it is great fun in the studio.

ewalling
05-29-2010, 04:08 PM
...and run it though a Roland synthesizer to a Fender Acoustasonic. The guitar itself plays like an electric...very easy to fret and play scales and leads. The piezo sounds great through a Dtar Mama Bear, a little quacky straight to the amp. The midi and synth is where the instrument really opens new sonic doors. You can split out the analog and Midi signals so that you are providing your own back up. Think something like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPL3O7NmgpI

I have not gigged with it, but it is great fun in the studio.

How do you find the scale length? It's a bit longer than standard, isn't it?

Thanks for the clip. Not sure I'm too impressed with that version to be quite honest, though!

hreboredo
05-29-2010, 04:55 PM
I have the Duet version with the LR Baggs built in. Great stage nylon and it's fun to just play around the house. Mine has the full 2" classical nut and I really like that. Only downside is you really do have to plug it in if you're going to play out so one day I might have to sell it to buy a more traditional classical. Until then it's a great little hybrid guitar.

ewalling
05-29-2010, 11:45 PM
I have the Duet version with the LR Baggs built in. Great stage nylon and it's fun to just play around the house. Mine has the full 2" classical nut and I really like that. Only downside is you really do have to plug it in if you're going to play out so one day I might have to sell it to buy a more traditional classical. Until then it's a great little hybrid guitar.

I really like the look of the Duet - I love the 12 frrets to the body - but the 2" nut width puts me off. If only they did that version with a 1 7/8"!

robot
05-30-2010, 12:39 AM
The midi stuff, is amazing. Guitar make almost sitar noise.

David Hilyard
05-30-2010, 12:52 AM
The midi stuff, is amazing. Guitar make almost sitar noise.

Good to know you are open to things beyond Torres, Ramirez, and not owning anything beyond what might seem to be accepted in today's world.

ewalling
05-30-2010, 09:30 AM
Good to know you are open to things beyond Torres, Ramirez, and not owning anything beyond what might seem to be accepted in today's world.

What does the second half of your sentence mean, David?

David Hilyard
05-30-2010, 09:55 AM
What does the second half of your sentence mean, David?

I have no idea. :)

Forensicguy
05-30-2010, 12:10 PM
I have the Duet version with the LR Baggs built in. Great stage nylon and it's fun to just play around the house. Mine has the full 2" classical nut and I really like that. Only downside is you really do have to plug it in if you're going to play out so one day I might have to sell it to buy a more traditional classical. Until then it's a great little hybrid guitar.

I have one as well. I'd like a 1-7/8" nut width version if they made that! But I've adapted to the 2" nut width as that is the only sized nylons I've ever played.

One day, perhaps I'd consider a Taylor... but until then, this guitar is fine for playing plugged in. It sounds good unplugged too, but it's too soft in volume really. Best plugged in.

BLenmark
05-30-2010, 01:14 PM
Here are the specs for my Godin:

16" fingerboard radius
25 1/2" Scale
1 7/8" nut width

As far as my feelings about the scale length, it doesn't feel like my more traditional classical, which if fine by me. It feels more like a strat with a wider neck, and I suppose I play it as such. So it in that sense, it is more like a crossover of sorts...the feel of nylon strings under your fretting hand with the scale to allow access to the upper register.

Add to the the pedal work to play (for example) an Am string backing, hold it with a pedal, and then bring in your nylon guitar sound to play over the top of it...now that is multitasking!

Aesthetically, I was never crazy about the controls in the upper bout. But after a while, the functionality that the mixed Midi and analog signals offer outweighs my desire for a more elegant design. I mean, a pair of channel locks will never win a a beauty pageant, but if you need to remove a seized or rounded off bolt, which tool do you reach for? Form follows function.

robot
05-30-2010, 03:31 PM
Has, anybody tried the model with no frets? This guitar is great. Now there is no need for a keyboard player.

jackstrat
06-01-2010, 08:40 AM
I have the ACS-SA nylon and the Multiac Spectrum (Steel string) SA, and both are incredible. If a do-over was possible, I would go with the premium nylon multiac as it sounds better than my ACS-SA. I have been plugging in lately through the Aura Spectrum box and it helps both guitars sound more like full acoustics.

JackL

edham
06-01-2010, 09:29 PM
Has, anybody tried the model with no frets? .

I had a glissentar. Cool idea.
Ultimately your stuck with the piezo sound of it though.
But I dug it enough to have one of my cheaper classicals turned into a fretless. Sounds great recorded and I have found some interesting uses for it.

jmiked
06-02-2010, 06:07 PM
I've played more than a few Godin nylon stringers, and the ergonomics just don't fit me. It always ends up with the peghead way too far away for comfortable playing, I really need a 12 fret neck.

Mike

Forensicguy
06-02-2010, 06:09 PM
I've played more than a few Godin nylon stringers, and the ergonomics just don't fit me. It always ends up with the peghead way too far away for comfortable playing, I really need a 12 fret neck.

Mike

My Godin is a 12 fret... 2" nut width Concert Grand Duet.

ewalling
06-02-2010, 09:08 PM
My Godin is a 12 fret... 2" nut width Concert Grand Duet.

But that's a problem for me with Godin's; great guitars though they might be, the necks are either too long or the nut width is too wide!

jmiked
06-02-2010, 10:30 PM
My Godin is a 12 fret... 2" nut width Concert Grand Duet.

Yep, but by the time I played one of those, I already had a Taylor NS, a Gibson Chet Atkins CE, and a custom-made nylon stringer. The Godin didn’t offer a clear advantage to those, so I never pursued it.

The 2" wide nut is a hair wider than I like, also.

SMan
06-02-2010, 10:47 PM
My Godin is a 12 fret... 2" nut width Concert Grand Duet.

I have one of them. Great guitar. :up:

Foss38
06-04-2010, 03:33 PM
I'm curious to know the difference in tone between the older Godin Grand concert with the RMC hexaphonic's and the newer Duet Ambiance. Anyone able to compare?

brad4d8
06-08-2010, 08:57 PM
I have a Godin nylon, I think it's an ACS, with the synth pickup. I have a Roland synth, but haven't had a lot of time to work with it. I like it better than my Gibson Chet Atkins CE, not sure why. I do have a Guild Mark V for playing acoustic, as well as a very intro level Bernabe, so I the Godin is really only for use when I need to amp it.
Brad

Foster
06-09-2010, 01:24 PM
I have a Grand Concert SA (with the synth access), and also their new Grand Concert Ambiance (with the custom Fishman imaging electronics package), and I love 'em both. Being a long-time nylon player, the 12-fret neck and 2" nut suit me very well, and the slight radius makes for a very comfy neck for me.

Another thing I've come to really like about the Godins are the control sliders in the upper-left bout. At first I wasn't sure about the idea, thinking that knobs would be much more intuitive. But I've realized that being able to visually review all your settings at a glance is a huge advantage, and with a little practice using the sliders, tweaking your volumes, EQ or whatever is very easy.

Actually, the only change I would make to Godins is cosmetic -- a little trim around the edges would set it off nicely. I may have to indulge in a little custom abalone inlay work one of these days.
;)

Goofball Jones
09-13-2010, 12:50 PM
In regards to the scale length, I've heard this several times about Godin. But isn't 25.5" the normal scale length? Every classical I've looked at had that scale length, so why are people saying that the Godin's have a longer than normal scale length?

What am i missing here?

Shadowraptor
09-13-2010, 07:07 PM
Too heavy and awkward for a nylon, but sounds great when plugged in.

ewalling
09-25-2010, 06:58 PM
In regards to the scale length, I've heard this several times about Godin. But isn't 25.5" the normal scale length? Every classical I've looked at had that scale length, so why are people saying that the Godin's have a longer than normal scale length?

What am i missing here?

It's where that 25.5" is distributed. On a classical, the strings go quite a long across the main box of the guitar, which means there isn't too much neck to negotiate. On a Godin, a lot of the 25.5" is in the neck, which can be less comfortable.

Jitterbug
09-28-2010, 04:52 AM
I exchanged my Godin Multiac SA for the Grand Concert SA, since the Multiac was designed to played either resting on the right leg or standing, and the Grand Concert the ergonomics are the same as a classical guitar and ok for resting on the left leg.

ewalling
09-28-2010, 08:04 AM
I exchanged my Godin Multiac SA for the Grand Concert SA, since the Multiac was designed to played either resting on the right leg or standing, and the Grand Concert the ergonomics are the same as a classical guitar and ok for resting on the left leg.

Do you find that the neck feels just like a classical, or is it a little easier for us steel string players? I have to say I prefer the overall design of the Grand Concert, but neck on a standard classical is a problem for me.

Guit Hacker
09-30-2010, 07:47 PM
I owned a Duet for years and it definitely had some good points. I was playing Gypsy Kings, Strunz and Farah and some Brazilian music.

The Good;
The duet really helps with body taps since it has a built-in mic. It also helped with mellowing the quack of the piezo. Of course you can get too much mic and have feedback problems, but I found that it handled higher volumes better than full acoustic guitars. The smaller body and access up the neck were also very nice for gigging. I found it to be very versatile.

The Bad;
As with most mass produced instruments there can be a huge differences in each instrument. My friends and I owned 4 duets and there were huge differences in acoustic properties, pup response and intonation:sick:. The cedar top with a satin finish typically gave the instrument a more dynamic and open sound even with the lack of body. The high gloss spruce held up better to body taps but sounded fairly dead (when directly compared to the cedar/satin). I didn't like the 1 7/8" nut, the radius of the fret board or the fact that the SA version was the only one that came with an ebony board (but these are personal preferences).

Overall;
If I was still gigging.....I would probably buy a Grand Concert Duet and be quite happy, but would still try and stick a mic in front an actual acoustic whenever I got the chance;).

Jitterbug
10-01-2010, 04:47 AM
Do you find that the neck feels just like a classical, or is it a little easier for us steel string players? I have to say I prefer the overall design of the Grand Concert, but neck on a standard classical is a problem for me.

Neck does feel a little better than a standard classical, the radiused fingerboard does make barre passages a bit easier.

Andy