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michaelhalliday
09-18-2000, 10:27 AM
OK, I love the way a 12 string sounds when others play them , but I haven't the faintest idea what to do with one? I can strum a c- chord and a;ll on it, but can't do much more!

I am basically a fingerpicker on a six string and not very good at that!

How do you get "into" a 12-string? Do I need special lessons? Can you fingerpick one of these beasts? Should I be pretty good player before attempting to play a 12-string?

Any thoughts from someone else who has made the transition?

J.R. Rogers
09-18-2000, 10:40 AM
I never found a 12-string to be much harder to play than a 6-string, at least not a Taylor http://taylorforum.com/ubb/wink.gif ... You simply have to get used to the "feel" of the 12-string, which should take long at all. The most important advice I can give you is to start with a GOOD 12-string guitar, like a Taylor. Ovation also makes a 12-string with good action. I once had an Epiphone 12-string, that was such a pain to play, I gave up on 12-string for a few years... until I played my Taylor 355. The 355 was a dream to play. Very easy.

J.R.

Noflatpick
09-18-2000, 07:10 PM
A good 12 string plays just as easy as a 6 string, it just requires a little more pressure on the strings with your fretting hand.

I have a Guild JF-55 (see "other acoustics" discussion) and I fingerpick the hell out of it.

I love the sound of them.

michaelhalliday
09-18-2000, 09:47 PM
so, when you fingerpick one, you pick both adjacent string together?

I stop in the ole guitar center and see how it feels..

I'll have to ask my guitar teacher if he has one, and what he thinks. (He probably thinks I should practice the **** 6 string one I have more.....but I do like the sound of 12 strings...)

Philip Holmes
10-03-2000, 12:02 AM
Michael, the only way to get better on any instrument is to practise. The difference between a 12 and a 6 string is the width of the neck , thats it. I have been fingerpicking my 555 for eons now and find on a new piece if I just go slowly and figue out what I want to do, it eventually comes. Patience my friend, but have fun getting there!
Philip

Joe Carpenter
10-03-2000, 11:04 AM
Michael,

Of course you can "fingerpick one of these beasts". Pick up any Leo Kottke CD and you'll find out why Taylor has the Leo Kottke Signature Model 12 string (and 6 btw).
It's a great 12 string. Tuned 1.5 to 2.5 steps down with heavy medium strings,it gives that Kottke 12 string "roar" tone. Imho, it's the best 12 string out there. I've been playing one since '91, and it's "a keeper". <s>

As for the actual playing....yep, it's just like a 6 string. You hit both strings (1st and 2nd strings are in unison, the rest are octaves) very easily. beats me what your instructor will say....but you're the player, not him!

Hope this helps.

Joe

GRW3
10-03-2000, 06:26 PM
I saw a Chris Proctor clinic where he played an LKSM 12. He used a thumbpick to his advantage as that let him pick the strings indivdually. (The octave G string is the highest pitched string)

Another cool thing he did was to use a mute. The mute was a length of foam rubber under the strings at the bridge. He played a song with a long verse chorus followed by a bridge followed by a recapitulation of the verse/chorus. Between the bridge and the last verse/chorus he pulled out the mute. His subsequent playing sounded like he had been joined by a band.



------------------
George Wilson

ljm712
10-20-2000, 09:38 PM
My 555 is the easiest playing 12 string I have ever owned or played. Taylor wins the award for best 12 string hands down. I have had others and this one is the best. It plays as easily as most 6 strings, so if you get a 12 string that is set up the way the Taylors are, you may have to take a bit of time to get used to the wider neck, but the fingering shouldn't be much of a problem. Maybe you'll develop your callouses twice as fast!

Dennis
10-21-2000, 01:36 AM
I own 2 electric 12-strings (both Rickenbacker) and a GORGEOUS custom made W65 from Taylor. Why play one? Because. There is a sound that can't be duplicated in any way. I've owned other 12 strings, and played plenty of them. But, as I'm sure you know or suspect, the sustain of a Taylor (and true for their 12 strings) is unparalleled. I just LOVE playing that guitar. I finger pick, and I use a pick, depending upon the piece I'm playing. Wanna have some fun? Pop that Kyser 12-string capo on the 7th fret and rip into Here Comes the Sun by G. Harrison. Absolutely beautiful. One of these days, I'll post a pic of my W65 on this site if anyone is interested.

J.R. Rogers
10-21-2000, 09:05 AM
Yes! Please send me the pictures! I'm regretting that I sold my NAMM show W65E... the new owner is extremely happy with it, and I"m glad for him. I love my new 655CE, though. Taylor really knows how to make a 12-string.

J.R.

buddiesorg
12-20-2000, 05:50 PM
Hey, JR. I think "your" W65 was "mine" first. Did you get it this year at Buffalo Brothers?

It is a very beautiful, but I don't regret trading it in. I have a beautiful Goodall Walnut CJ in its place. Although the Walnut isn't as stunning, I like the sound much better and play it much more than I played the Taylor. I think it has something to do with the walnut top.

Guitarpro2play
04-20-2011, 06:19 AM
I bought a stagg 12 strings guitar for 170Euro. I have trouble with the G string (The thin one). I am trying to tune it , but the string broke before it gets to F#.
What can I do?

Guitarpro2play
04-20-2011, 06:27 AM
OK, I love the way a 12 string sounds when others play them , but I haven't the faintest idea what to do with one? I can strum a c- chord and a;ll on it, but can't do much more!

I am basically a fingerpicker on a six string and not very good at that!

How do you get "into" a 12-string? Do I need special lessons? Can you fingerpick one of these beasts? Should I be pretty good player before attempting to play a 12-string?

Any thoughts from someone else who has made the transition?

Look, playing the 12 strings guitar is not too hard for someone who can playing good the 6 strings guitar. Also, the 12 strings guitar is not for beginners and not for someone who doesn't playing music very often. It needs too much work to learn good 12 strings guitar.

So, learn very good the simple guitar and if you think that you are ready, try the 12 strings guitar.

PaulVanJohnson
04-20-2011, 08:05 AM
I've played 6-string acoustic and electric for 35 years but logged maybe 60 minutes on 12-string guitars my entire life. I love the cool 12-string sounds of The Beatles, George Harrison (solo), The Byrds, Tom Petty, Wilburys, etc and recently bought a Taylor 856ce (I posted another thread to describe how I chose the 856):

http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=213567

I've had my 856 for about three weeks and in principle, it's not that different than a 6-string but I've noticed some subtle things that are very different. First - over many years I've learned to unconsciously mute the unplayed strings in various ways - partly because I play electric guitar also. It's such a habit that I don't even notice things like wrapping my thumb around to mute the low E string when I play chords with 5th string roots. That "thumb wrapped mute" works fine on the low small 6th string but that leaves the full-sized E string un-muted. The same problem occurs when muting other strings with the edge of a finger from below. I don't consider these headaches at all but fun challenges due to learning something new. Also - some jazz chords with close intervals don't sound very good (to my ear anyway) due to clashing overtones.

So I wouldn't say that it's' "easy" but it's not a big leap from 6 to twelve strings and the amazing sound is certainly worth the small learning curve. I'm only 3-weeks in and love mine. And Taylor makes some of the best, easiest-to-play 12-string guitars in the business. Good luck!

Kevin A
04-20-2011, 05:27 PM
How do you get "into" a 12-string? Do I need special lessons? Can you fingerpick one of these beasts? Should I be pretty good player before attempting to play a 12-string?

Any thoughts from someone else who has made the transition?
I learned to play guitar on a 12-stringóin hindsight, a 12-string wasnt the easiest way to go for a novice player. But it made the transition to 6-string relatively painless. :)
No special lessons neededójust spend some time developing the finger-strength and dexterity a 12-string can require. If you are dedicated to the 12, you'll amaze yourself how quickly it will start to feel more 'natural' and the intimidation factor diminishes.

I also agree with the observation that Taylor 12s are 'easy' to play compared to some other manufacturersóbut it really matters how the guitar itself is set-up. A good set-up is pretty invaluable in determining the level of frustration or joy a 12-string can provide the player.

Play a variety of 12-strings. I love the rumbly tone of the Guild 12-strings more so than the Taylors I've heard & played. Breedlove also makes a very NICE 12-string.

Chazmo
04-21-2011, 03:49 PM
I admit to changing my right hand technique -- such as it is, being the hack that I am -- for 12-string.

Since the strings slope downward toward the bass side (because the narrower strings are on the bass side), I find I straighten the tips of my fingers and "stroke" the strings more than "pluck" them, as I do on a 6-string. The idea (for me) is to touch both strings in each course when I make a note sound.

The 12-string is also more difficult to play cleanly, i.e., such that your left hand fingers are not muting strings they're note supposed to. The 12-string's wider neck helps, but it's still more difficult than 6.

vintageom
04-21-2011, 03:58 PM
I have owned several and played many 12 strings over 38 years.

A couple of bits of advice for a newbie to 12 string guitars.

Rule number 1: The action and set up has to be EXCELLENT to make it a pleasure to play and to practice.

Rule number 2: If you violate rule number 1, you will have wasted your money because it will live in its case most of its life with you.

Yes you can struggle with high action and too wide of necks etc, but these conditions do affect your playing and endurance.

sachi
04-21-2011, 04:03 PM
Hey, everyone - note that this is a resurrected thread from ELEVEN years ago.

Guitar Pro reopened it to ask this question:

I bought a stagg 12 strings guitar for ***Euro. I have trouble with the G string (The thin one). I am trying to tune it , but the string broke before it gets to F#.
What can I do?

GP, where does the string break? At the nut? The saddle? Or somewhere else? That can give you a clue. If the string breaks at the nut, it may be because the nut slot is too narrow and the string is binding. Either that, or there can be a sharp edge on the nut or the saddle

Tell us more and we'll try to help you out.

outhawkn
08-09-2011, 02:59 PM
I bought a stagg 12 strings guitar for 170Euro. I have trouble with the G string (The thin one). I am trying to tune it , but the string broke before it gets to F#.
What can I do?

Tune your entire guitar down a half step, then capo the first fret when needed....

steamfurnace
08-10-2011, 07:36 AM
I own a number of 12 strings as well; 2 Rickenbackers, an Alvarez 5054, Takamine EF381SC, and a newly acquired Guild F412. I currently gig with the Takamine and an acoustic electric 6 string. In a 4 hour gig, 2 1/2 hours are probably played on the 12 string. I love the way it really fills out the sound for a solo acoustic player/singer.